Category: Medical

Home of Fred the Snake (and Dr. Peter)

Thinking about placebos, and healing. Thank you, Dad

  Patients and doctors want to know which treatments “really work”. That is not too difficult when dealing with something mechanical, like fixing a broken bone, stopping bleeding or removing a stone. The problem comes when trying to relieve pain when it has no identifiable and fixable cause. Many patients with headaches or back pains…
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Our Apollo story…..we boldly went

In 1994, Rob Hawes and I joined the faculty at the Medical University of South Carolina, in Charleston, to found a multi-disciplinary Digestive Disease Center. We were both experts in minimally invasive treatments, using endoscopes through the mouth or anus to manage clinical problems that previously required open surgery. While the endoscopes themselves were well…
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China WOW! 40 years on

We are just back from Shanghai, after attending a meeting to celebrate the 50th anniversary of ERCP. It was kindly and brilliantly hosted by Professor Hu Bing (standing behind me at the dinner). I enjoyed sharing the podium with Joseph Leung and Sydney Chung, who founded the Endoscopy unit at Prince of Wales Hospital in…
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Fifty years of ERCP

In case you might like to read my recent review “Fifty years of ERCP”, here is the link https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1XN~p3mGpVzge

50 years in the Bile duct and Pancreas

If you have 43 minutes to spare, here is a recording of my recent presentation at MUSC Medicine Grand rounds. http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/v/medicine/20171130_Cotton.html    

Down English Memory lanes

Just back from three great weeks in England, visiting our special families, as described in my last blog. I took the opportunity to reconnect with several friends from the (very) distant past, and cannot resist sharing them with you. Joe Clayton and I met 60 years ago, in 1957, when we both represented Cambridge University…
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Two new medical publications

A survey of credentialing for ERCP in the United States https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gie.2017.03.1530 How much pain relief do patients expect after cholecystectomy? http://em.rdcu.be/wf/click?upn=KP7O1RED-2BlD0F9LDqGVeSMQmWdTq9BpXT-2FFE5lpsKp0-3D_RLjM3EiP19d2W-2BRyiC55StGEdECkMlY3fp4OuMSsuV6A6CyvAgFp7ZpI71eXSVN2jI7O7AlSUceKnPqeNH05tsIaS6TUlFcZUFcc82Z80Z5VbaXFsA09PjLjhtEe0RRGCSF7-2Br0mpAtjZLf3-2BCqRlUWCZXCeTVOR0tdfgf-2FUnxlDoZFCjoXduHYaRfC78Yn6u7-2FIfclrP4UR3k-2F70kMc9ivF2ILxjcv3eAlzsMDmdmD1T5th86GcjvyHrAB6rUxWVfKUA7wYX-2FzPVerSDDRR-2BQ-3D-3D

Enhancing quality in GI health care

  How do you/we choose from all those who wish to serve us, whether restauranteurs, plumbers or doctors? How do we know which or who is good, or even excellent? Locally we can rely on our own experience and the recommendations of friends. But it is more difficult away from home. Some things like restaurants…
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A National Health system in USA?

The current bizarre health care “discussions” in Washington prompt me to comment. I grew up with, and served in, the National Health Service in Britain. When initiated in 1947 it was relatively inexpensive, since medical care was much less complex and most people died soon after retirement, if not before. The funding did not keep up…
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South Africa part three – CapeTown

After the wonderful week in the game parks with family, Marion and I headed to CapeTown, where I was to be visiting professor at Groote Schuur hospital. We splurged by arriving on the famous Blue Train from Pretoria. 36 hours of pampering, with great (too much) food. The landscape was rather monotonous until the mountainous…
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